Friendship Oak

On a trip to Long Beach, Mississippi a couple of years ago with two of my traveling buddies, we spied this humongous tree on the side of a large building (which turned out to be the Southern Mississippi Gulf Park Campus), and decided to have a closer look.

This sign was posted at the entrance.
We were amazed by its size!
It was roped off, so this was a close as we could get.

After returning home, I learned that as of 2011, this tree stood 59 feet high, and had a circumference of 19.8 feet. Throughout its long life, it has survived hurricane winds that have stripped it of its leaves, and has had its roots saturated with seawater from storm surges from the Gulf of Mexico. At least twice since the 1950s, acorns have been gathered for seedlings for replanting along the Mississippi Gulf Coast to replace the live oaks that were destroyed by Hurricanes Camille and Katrina.

A view of the Gulf from the front of the campus.

Published by

KT Workman

KT Workman grew up in the rural South without the benefit of cell phones or the Internet, a time and place that has heavily influenced her writing. To this day, when she puts pen to paper—or fingers to keyboard—nine times out of ten her mind veers south onto that old, familiar road. It goes home. KT resides in Arkansas where she writes a wide variety of gothic and speculative fiction, poetry, and dabbles in watercolor painting and amateur photography.

6 thoughts on “Friendship Oak”

    1. Thank you, Vivienne, and yes, old can still be beautiful. The faces of some of the most beautiful women (and handsome men) I have known are a network of wrinkles carved by life. We, and nature, are always a work in progress.

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