Window, Church, and Boat




These are some paintings I did for my online watercolor painting course that I think turned out fairly well. As I have said before, some are so bad they will never see the light of day–or be used as a WordPress post. 😊 But the bad ones do serve a purpose: a learning experience on what not to do.


©2021 KT Workman

All About The Sky

As I stated in an earlier post, I am just beginning my watercolor painting journey, so don’t expect professional quality. That being said…

These two watercolor paintings were done for a class, its purpose to illustrate that a clear sky doesn’t have to be blue, especially when its the focal point. I must say, the yellow sky makes the entire picture more dramatic.

Dramatic Sky
Simple Sky

Though I do like the simplicity of the small boat bobbing on a blue sea under a blue sky. To me, it has an allover calming effect.

©2021 KT Workman

A Road to Somewhere

I can’t say why, but this watercolor I did a while back for a class is one of my favorites of all the good, passable, bad, and downright ugly paintings I have done over the last several months. It’s a keeper. To me, it has a certain mystery about it. Does the road take us to a pleasant place, perhaps a farmhouse where we can sit on the porch and drink sweet iced tea while watching the sun go down; or instead (how my mind tends to wander), leads to a run-down shed that has a meat hook hanging from the ceiling, saws and knives laid out on an old wooden bench, and puddles of dark stains on the dirt floor? I suppose, like most things in life, perception is all in the mind of the beholder.

©️2021 KT Workman

Friendship Oak

On a trip to Long Beach, Mississippi a couple of years ago with two of my traveling buddies, we spied this humongous tree on the side of a large building (which turned out to be the Southern Mississippi Gulf Park Campus), and decided to have a closer look.

This sign was posted at the entrance.
We were amazed by its size!
It was roped off, so this was a close as we could get.

After returning home, I learned that as of 2011, this tree stood 59 feet high, and had a circumference of 19.8 feet. Throughout its long life, it has survived hurricane winds that have stripped it of its leaves, and has had its roots saturated with seawater from storm surges from the Gulf of Mexico. At least twice since the 1950s, acorns have been gathered for seedlings for replanting along the Mississippi Gulf Coast to replace the live oaks that were destroyed by Hurricanes Camille and Katrina.

A view of the Gulf from the front of the campus.

Winter in August

This is a simple monochromatic watercolor painting of a winter scene I did for my class a couple months ago. Only one color was used, raw umber muddied down a little using neutral tint. The point of this lesson was to let the watercolor paper serve as the color white. And on this early-August day here in the South, I have to say all that snow looks pretty darn good.


Putting on a Show

At the urging of a recent (as of today) WordPress friend and excellent photographer, Timmothy Price at http://offcenternoteven.com, I decided to start sharing some pictures I have taken with my iPhone, along with watercolor paintings I have done. Please don’t judge either too harshly because I am strictly an amateur concerning both. I place no copyright on the photos I share; anyone is free to copy and use.

In early spring, the flowers on an oak-leaf hydrangea are creamy white…
Then, the flowers gradually take on a pink hue…
And as summer sets in, turn bronze.

I have several oak leaf hydrangeas around my home. They are very hardy, but do best in partial shade.